Posted in Education, Family, Gardening, parenting, Social Change, Uncategorized

Simple Living for Teens

My husband and I have been trying to buy a house for almost a year now (although I assure you it seems like decades). While doing so I started to become obsessed with this hole small house movement that is going on. I know I’m a little late on the trend and it’s all over the place now but I still was on Pinterest finding anything I could about tiny homes and how to convince my husband it was a good idea.

Well we did finally find a house and it’s not tiny by the tiny home standards (1,120 sqft) but some would consider it small so I am calling it a win! However, what got me thinking about the tiny homes and why they’re so great is that fact that they force you to live more simply. I didn’t have much in the way of material items growing up and I lived in a small home. But that made me more apt to go outside, spend time in the living room, and not accumulate things. I think now it’s easy for kids and teens to get swept up in this “he/she has more than I do” competition that happens.

Just the other day a mother was talking about taking her son to a birthday party. She had gotten the friend a generous gift but during the party he received a new iPod touch from a different friend. The woman’s son was upset thinking maybe they didn’t give his friend enough. This is a problem in my opinion that affects a lot of young people. Here are some ways I have read about to help your kids and teens understand how to live more simply. I think that understanding the concept and it’s benefits will help them in the future.

 

For an example of a tiny home built by a young person (college student but still) check out this article.

 

1) Let your kids start helping you shop early on. Show them that it is a process to narrow down what you really need. If they just see you come home with a trunk full of food then it would reason that you just go to the store and throw a bunch of stuff in your cart all willy nilly. Take them and show them how to be selective so you don’t end up getting things that will cause waste.

 

2) Get your kids (especially your teens) more excited about the outdoors. There’s a lot to do outside all year round. The more people are active outside their homes the less likely they are to keep acquire stuff for inside. Gardening is one great activity. Sports, walking, owning an outdoor pet or one that needs to be walked, hiking, playing in the snow and rain, animal hunting, swimming, water balloon or shaving cream fight, catch fireflies. There’s endless things to do in the outdoor. Like…

Cartoon of tents and campfire.

3) Go camping. We are huge camping lovers here and there’s nothing like getting back to the basics to unwind. There’s something about turning off your phone and leaving your computer at home and just sleeping in nature. Totally cheesy I know but I can’t wait to get my daughter into camping. Seeing how relaxed and how much fun it can be doing something so simple will help instill that way of living.

 

4) Decrease your family drama. Living simply doesn’t just mean reducing your clutter, items, and wants. It also means getting to a more easy going state of living. Having open communication as a family and reducing the amount of stress and tension is a benefit of simple living.

 

5) This idea isn’t for everyone. When I was in high school I heard someone give a speech at the church I went to at the time about a program called CFCA (Christian Foundation for Children and Aging now called Unbound). It was a Christian nonprofit that worked in several countries. It wasn’t a typical sponsor program. They actually built towns and farms for people to work at and live in, in addition to providing monetary help to sponsored children and elderly. I talked my mom into sponsoring a kid (his name was Johnathan) who we helped from age 10 to 18. We went to visit him in Guatemala when he turned 18 and talked to him about how our support had helped throughout the years. We had been writing him at least once every other month for all that time so I felt like I actually knew him. Growing up with that helped me when I got a little greedy. Even as an adult when I decided to sponsor my own, it really keeps you in check when you start to get overwhelmed with what really isn’t important. There are other nonprofit and volunteer ideas available that will have the same affect on your teen and family.

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Author:

I am writer, librarian, teacher, mother, cartoon addict, doodler, and coffee/tea enthusiast.

One thought on “Simple Living for Teens

  1. GREAT Ideas for teaching kids about living simple lives and getting rid of all the things that not only disconnect us from each other, but make people feel like they are missing something if they don’t have the latest and greatest game or computer or phone.

    Like

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