I read this article today and it really struck a chord with me as far as the whole working versus being a sahm debate goes. I’ve always, ALWAYS, said I couldn’t be a stay at home mom. And I still think that. I must have some degree of work stimulation.

However, despite where you are in that argument I think what the author writes about (the snapping more on work days, not appreciating the time you do have when you get off of work because you’re so exhausted, etc) a lot of parents will be able to relate to.

She is talking more about trying to homeschool in addition to working, but I think the ideals can be used for either. The fact that she has her PhD and still decided to stay home I think puts a lot into perspective as far as what she is saying. I don’t have a PhD but I’ve always this little selfish thing inside me that said “you can’t give up your schooling to be at home with your kids”. But why can’t I? Or at least sacrifice some of what I’ve worked for to be there for them more?

I don’t know, I’m just rambling now but it’s a good read if you are struggling with the decision like I have (well still am technically).

via Quitting Work to Homeschool

Here’s some working mom eCards to lighten the mood.workingmom1e19f27c8de05733857713993a14d2207parenting6c2f6ee121e9767f8627f88068ee55017

 

 

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Quitting Work to Homeschool- Reblog

Posted in Education, Family, fun, history, Holidays, reading, summer, teaching, toddlers, Uncategorized

Summer Learning: A lesson on pirates

I haven’t actually done any “educational” posts in awhile and my daughter asked me this morning if we could learn about pirates.

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I’m like YES, obviously we can learn about pirates.

Little known fact about me; I used to be obsessed with pirates. I did a research paper in graduate school about Blackbeard as my example of good and bad leadership skills. Peter and Wendy was actually the first chapter book that I read out loud to my daughter. I found myself censoring a few things but I digress-

I decided since I would be looking up some things for her to learn that I would share them with you to add some education to your summer break.

(This post contains affiliate links)

Treasure hunts-

One of the first things you think of, when you think of pirates, is lost treasure. “Booty” it’s called. Coins, jewels, and other riches obtained by piracy (theft generally speaking).

Treasure hunts are easy to set up at home. You can use rocks, seashells, plastic money, or their own toys. Hide them around your backyard or in your house. The big treasure prize should marked on a “map”.

Is this historically accurate? Not really. Most pirates didn’t bury their treasure, they spent it. One of the most famous pirates who did actually have a hidden buried treasure was Captain William Kidd. His loot has since all been found (at least they think so).

 

Legends and Folklore-

One thing pirates were, were storytellers. If you think about it, all that time on the sea with little to do in between navigating, thieving, and drinking; storytelling and music were a must.

Here is some pirate folklore to share with your family. Most of the stories are ghost stories or legends in nature. Some are about actual historical figures. There are plenty of stories out there about curses and signs of impending doom. A shark following the ship for instance meant death was approaching. Fridays were a unlucky day to sail. Gold hoop earrings could bring the pirate good luck and fortune on their travels. Never change the name of your boat, unless you want to run aground.

Some of the most famous folklore to come from pirates and other sailors were those of the mermaid. Different countries have different takes on what a mermaid is or was, and different ideas on what they looked like. Some believed them to be beautiful and wanting to help sailors get to safety. Most believed mermaids were there to lure men to their deaths.

I love the “You Wouldn’t Want to be a…” series. Lucky for you they have a pirate one!

Geography- 

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Piracy took place all over the world, but during the Gold Age of Piracy (1650’s to 1720’s) most of the action was in the Caribbean. They were referred to as Buccaneers if they were Caribbean pirates. Although Pirates of the Caribbean was extremely fictional, the city of Tortuga was quite accurate. It was a high spot for pirates to refresh before hitting the high seas again. Tortuga was off the island of Hispaniola.

Why was this area so hot to trot for pirates? Spanish ships were constantly trying to get gold and jewels back to England and Spain for one. For two, most of the indigenous peoples of the area were killed off in many of the islands thanks to settlements centuries earlier. Three, there were a lot of places to hide.

It was a great time to be a pirate. But all good things come to an end and eventually England got sick of their money and ships going into the sea. The navy started to hunt down pirates in a ruthless movement to end the Golden Age and they succeeded.

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Some resources to learn the geography of the Caribbean:

Geography Lesson: The Wonderfully Diverse Caribbean!

– Map making exercise for older elementary students. Great idea!

Jamaican Games for Fine and Gross Motor Skills Really cool list of ideas 

 Making steel drums for kids

 

 

Just for fun-

Mad Libs are a fun way to practice language arts skills! {Free printable}:

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Worksheets: Treasure Island Crossword Puzzle

For any adult wanting to brush up on their pirate knowledge I highly recommend this book:

And of course the classics:

        

Posted in Uncategorized

Literacy education at home

Teaching literacy, at home learning, out of school time learning, early literacy: all of these things are a passion if mine that I want to expand on. I am trying to get a sense of how others, people like you, really view your child’s literacy education. Not just young children, teens as well.

Please take a moment to do this survey. It will help me understand and launch a new program next year that I think we desperately need.

I appreciate your time. Sharing is caring 😁

Posted in Family, fun, Opinion, pop culture, Uncategorized

30 clean jokes for Dad and Joke Day!

June 17th is Father’s Day and July 1st is International Joke Day. So many good reasons for bad jokes.

Why does it seem so much easier to think of dirty, not child appropriate, jokes when put on the spot?

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Because we’re all just wrong in the head.

However! I am here to save you with some kid friendly, but hopefully still funny, jokes and puns to share for Father’s Day & International Joke Day!

  1. Two muffins are in the oven, side by side. One muffin says, “It’s really starting to get hot in here.” The other muffin looks over says “WOW! A talking muffin!”
  2. What do you call an old snowman? Water
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  4. I couldn’t figure out why the basketball was getting larger. Then it hit me…
  5. I’m good friends with 25 letters of the alphabet. I don’t know Y.
  6. What’s the stupidest animal in the jungle? A Polar Bear
  7. “You know, it’s times like this I wish I would have listened to what my mother told me.” “Why, what did your mother tell you?” “I don’t know I wasn’t listening.”
  8. Can a kangaroo jump higher than the Empire State Building? Of course, the Empire State Building can’t jump. Image result for laughing gif
  9. What did the buffalo say when his son went off to college. “Bison.”
  10. A horse walks into a bar. The bartender says, “hey.” The horse says, “yeah sure.”
  11. What’s red and smells like blue paint? Red paint.
  12. What did one cell, say to his sister cell when she stepped on his toe? Mitosis
  13. Time flies like an arrow, fruit flies like a banana.
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  15. What’s brown and sticky? A stick
  16. My mom told me to stop acting like a flamingo, so I had to put my foot down.
  17. A friend said to me the other day, “what rhymes with orange.” I said “No, it doesn’t.”
  18. What do you call a dog with no legs? It doesn’t matter, he’s not going to come.
  19. What did one nut say to the other when it was playing tag? I’m a cashew.
  20. If you say “Raise Up Lights” you just said “Razor Blades” with an Australian accent.
  21. The lawyer told the judge, “my client is trapped inside a penny.” The judge asked “what?” “He’s in a cent.”
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  23. A man was washing his car with his son, when his son asked “dad, can’t we use a sponge instead?”
  24. What do you call Bears with no ears? B
  25. Why was the math book sad? It had too many problems.
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  27. “My dog has no nose.” “Well how does he smell?” “Terrible.”
  28. How do you make an egg roll? You push it.
  29. Why do seagulls fly over the sea? If they flew over the bay they would be called bagels.
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Posted in Education, Social Change, Uncategorized

Finding hope for at risk students

Generally I try to keep my two jobs distant from each other just for the sake of not liking an “open concept” work life. However, we are doing a day of giving for the nonprofit I am the Executive Director of, Horizons Salisbury, May 16th 2018, and I feel compelled to shed some light on what that means exactly.

1. 132 students will not have Summer Learning Loss.

For those who do not know what summer learning loss is, it’s a phenomenon that has been studied since 1906. They found that during long breaks (be it summer, vacation, lapse in traditional instruction) students would actually regress in their education. Low-income students are generally more at risk for summer learning loss (or “the summer slide”) and year after year this will result in an achievement gap, putting them at a disadvantage to their peers. Programs like Horizons Salisbury is trying to close this gap through educational programming for these students.

2. 132 students will get the chance to swim, many still learning how to.

Swimming may not seem that important to everyone. However, there’s two major reasons why it is indeed crucial for our program. It’s a life saving skill. Again, low-income are more at risk for drowning. Why? Well for one, their access to swimming pools and instruction is limited, if available at all. Secondly, swimming is a skill that takes time and patience to develop. It’s harder for some children to learn it than it is others. But once they do (and they do learn to swim, it’s not just free time in the pool!) It’s a confidence builder the students take back to the classroom with them.

3. These at risk students will get “out of school time” education that generally is a privilege for students in higher socioeconomic households.

As stated in point one, without these initiaves our low-income students are automatically put at a disadvantage. We need to give them a fair chance at success in their academic careers.

4. These students will be one step closer to graduating high school.

Studies have shown, again and again, for the reasons mentioned above, that low-income students are more at risk for not graduating high school. Our goal is to get them to graduation to be college or career ready. In today’s competitive work force students need their diploma to have secure financial future to be able to end the cycle of poverty.

5. A small community like Salisbury, MD, will be stronger.

Even if you are reading this and you do not live in Salisbury, our community is probably very similar to yours. We have good points and bad. We’re not a huge city with ample opportunities for our students but were not small either. We consistently fall on the lower end of the scale when looking at the wealth in the state of Maryland. (Wicomico County)

Horizons Salisbury has dreams of expanding to all the shore but we need to keep the Wicomico County program strong first.

Our students are the future of our communities, and the more we support them and get them the education they deserve, the better we will all be as a whole.

Thank you for taking the time to read this. If you have any questions or concerns about the above information email me at Bglenn@horizonssalisbury.org. we appreciate your consideration in helping this cause and remember, no donation is too small to make a huge difference for at least one student.

If reading this after National Giving Day, you can support us anytime at http://www.horizonssalisbury.org

Posted in Family, Holidays, Mother's Day, Opinion, Uncategorized

Mother’s Day around the world

The root of our traditionally known “Mother’s Day” may be all American:

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Ahem, it may be thanks to Woodrow Wilson establishing the holiday in 1911, and it has since spread to other countries. BUT we may not technically be the first country to celebrate moms though (sorry, have a seat please), and not all places celebrate Mother’s Day the same.

One of the most similar celebrations is probably “Mothering Sunday” in the UK. This day, the fourth Sunday after Lent, has been around much longer than Mother’s Day, so maybe the U.S. should calm down. Back in the 17th Century Mothering Sunday was established as a day of reverence for the Virgin Mary. It has now meshed with Mother’s Day and is celebrated with cards, flowers, and expressions of love. There is such a thing as a Mothering cake, which is a rich almond cake.

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In Canada Mother’s Day is celebrated the same day it is in the U.S., the second Sunday of May. However, it seems to be a much bigger deal there. Phone traffic is at yearly high, card and candy sales sky rocket, and again, cakes are baked for mothers. No mothers allowed in the kitchen on Mother’s Day. Australia also has very similar customs for their mothers.

Also celebrated the same day as the U.S., Brazil celebrates mother’s the second Sunday in May. They exchange cards and words of affirmation for their mothers. But it seems the sweets flow aplenty in Brazil on Mother’s Day. Businesses stock up on pastries, baked goods, and candies. Gifts are a general staple to the day and recently there has been a trend in giving (and wanting) electronic gifts for Mother’s Day like tablets.

Ethiopia kind of puts us all to shame, they celebrate mothers for three days instead of one. Antrosht, as it is known, creates a time of remembrance and celebration with a large feast. Daughters bring vegetables, butter, and cheese, while boys will bring some kind of meat. The mother then prepares “hash” that the family enjoys together. There are special songs for the day and bonding, especially between mothers and daughters.

If three days seems a lot, Durga Puja is a celebration that lasts ten days. It’s a celebration of the Mother Goddess in India. It also celebrates the warrior Goddess Durgas’

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defeat over Mahishasura. All women are celebrated at this time and mothers seem to be extra appreciated. This event is very detailed in nature but I will at least say there are statues erected, parades, music, dancing, and plenty of rituals. Food is also a huge part of Durga Puja.

 

Probably the creepiest Mother’s Day tradition I have found has to be Yugoslavia. I would love to know if anyone knows if this still goes on, but apparently the tradition is that the children sneak into their mother’s room, tie her up, and she has to tell them where gifts are hidden in order to be released. Not a fan, js.

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