Posted in Education, Family, teaching

Kind of-Sort of-Unschooling

Unschooling seemed too out there for me when I first read about it. To be fair, homeschooling seemed too out there when I first thought about actually doing it. But unschooling was waaaaay out there. I read two or three articles about it and just went on my way. No curriculum? No lesson plans? No schedule? I can’t function like that, how would she even learn?

After a few months of homeschooling in the traditional sense (ie curriculum that mirrors traditional school) for my five-year-old, I am now thinking more about the theories behind unschooling and why they could be helpful for us. I have become a huge fan Sir Ken Robinson over the past few months and have done a lot of research for my continuing education on our public education system. That alone made me question why I was breaking up our learning the way that I was…because I was trying to copy what traditional school was doing. But why? Is that really the best way for them to learn? Who says? (more about that in my book *insert shameful plug here*)

One book about unschooling I enjoyed—>

I had planned our curriculum for the year by August. I had broken it down weekly. Now I wish I could have those two weeks of my life back. It’s been quite the road of frustration and learning on my end. Some of the lessons and ideas Gigi clicked with, others she didn’t. She does have special needs so I try to be as flexible with the timing of things as possible but I wasn’t caving on what we were learning. Maybe I should be? That’s the point of homeschooling in a broad sense is to cater better to your child’s educational needs.

For those of you who may be thinking about it, or just curious about what unschooling is, here’s what I’ve gathered and what I’m concerned with (maybe experienced unschoolers can correct any misconceptions I have):

Interests lead learning- this part makes sense. My daughter digests lessons that she’s picked out better than ones that I do. That seems like a no-brainer. If she’s interested in something she will want to learn, therefore she will learn.

So we are starting to implement that. I’ve left my type A, list making, yearly schedule on hold and asked her what subjects she wants. I had everything planned in the order I assumed she’d be learning at public kindergarten. Plus some extra stuff just for fun. We finished up mammals and we’re going to move to birds. She said no, she wants to learn about frogs. So frogs it is. Frogs and nutcrackers are our focus for December. We will see how the learning develops as we paint nutcrackers, watch the ballet, and maybe go frog hunting if it’s not freezing.

Subjects shouldn’t be divided- The idea is that is all subjects can stem from one original interest. This is not as concrete but as I continue to learn about the concept it is understandable.

For example, one of the first things my daughter said she wanted to learn about was Native Americans. Timing wise that worked out perfectly since we started in October and ended in November. Using videos, books, and worksheets we learned about the Woodland Indians. We learned geography studying a map of America and where their tribes were. We learned science by reading and discussing how they grew crops, the seasons, and the animals in that area. I left out the whole slaughtering of millions of people post the first Thanksgiving and how sordid our history really is. Maybe first grade…

This seems to flow well but the fact that I can’t track what we’re learning ahead of time is something I will have to adjust to. For the purposes of portfolio reviews (every state/county is different but where I live you do two a year and they have to approve your learning milestones) I will have to at least in retrospect try to document what we’ve covered.

Reading and math- My biggest pause with unschooling is the way a child learns to read. Unschooling philosophy says that children will pick it up as you go. Which basically means unschooling uses whole word learning applications. A child learns to read by being read to and then eventually, they will remember words and letters they see and piece them together on their own. Whole word learning isn’t wrong by any means but as a librarian, I feel like the mixed method approach is the best. Maybe? Learning phonics is just as important, at least I’ve always thought so.

Same goes for math. I get that you learn math everywhere- grocery store, counting flowers outside, counting clouds. But what about multiplication? Evens and odds? I get that some mathematical concepts can be a very natural learning process but some may not be so much.

These are the only two areas I think I will continue to try using worksheets and books. To be fair, my daughter does not like writing some days but she really wants to read. We are doing whole word applications with books that she picks out from the library. This has given her the reins on what she is learning to read. We also read My World books or BOB Books.
Are they exciting? No, but I explained to her those books break it down so that she can recognize the words when she sees them again on her own so she asks for them now during our reading time. They do work.

 

Phonics and spelling we will continue to use ABC Mouse, Brainquest, and Scholastic. I use the mix because they all have a different approach. As long as the time we spend on them is not long (like not past ten to fifteen minutes) we can usually get through a letter or sound without any pushback. That was another lesson for me being a first-time homeschooler. I was used to teaching in 45-minute blocks. At home, with one ADHD child with other stimuli around, ten minutes. Get it or get out.

The conclusion to all this is I still am learning the best way to homeschool a special needs child. Our schedule has not been consistent because of my job but that is ending in the next few weeks. I hope to be able to offer her more freedom and more creative learning utilizing her interests. So far, I know we will have to change the spring and summer curriculum I developed. Instead of learning things chronologically to mirror the traditional kindergarten classroom we will be:

A) Doing much more baking and cooking. Gigi loves baking and wants to open her own business. We are going to start writing down our recipes, creating new ones, finding places to bake for (ie nursing homes, her co-op group, family), and how to create more healthy recipes. We have even talked about creating a logo for “business”, she has a thing about logos. This way we are learning math, science, and writing.

B) Gardening/garden planning. We are creating a better play area outside this spring. Part of that play area is going to contain an edible garden. She is going to help with the planning, mapping, design, planting, monitoring, and then cooking with our ingredients. We will be learning geography, science, math, reading, and writing. Also PE!

C) Camping. We tried going camping when Gigi was three and I think my husband and I are still scarred from it. However, I think it may be a field trip idea for this year. Camping provides AMPLE learning experiences.

backyard-bicycle-bike-630770.jpg

After this year is over hopefully I can update you with how it went using her interest as our guide as opposed to the standard instruction of our area. We are basically working off of a very broad schedule of topics. Each month I have two to three main lessons (i.e. phonics, addition, counting to 40) type of goal and then a list of five to ten topics. If she has one of her own that I don’t have then I’ll add it in there as we go. If she doesn’t I will ask her what she’s interested in and we’ll try to steer our learning that way. I think for now it’s a good mix that will allow us more communication together about her education, give her more motivation, and allow me the satisfaction of knowing we are hitting markers and I’m able to report everything that I need to. Since I do still really like schedules and with her diagnosis schedules work well for keeping her anxiety down we will still have a daily schedule. I will post it once I figure out which one works best. We are also adding personal hygiene and life skills in her learning.

Unschoolers with feedback or success stories are welcome to comment 🙂

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Posted in DIY, Education, Family, Gardening, health

How to Start a Family Garden

First and foremost do not make this a chore! If you already an avid gardener and you know which plants you like, where you like them, how to perfectly make them grow, you need to kick some of that out the window. Kids are messy and will make a lot of mistakes. They will plant somethings too deep and somethings not deep enough. But let them mess up. Don’t go behind them and fix every single they do. Let them see the outcome; these grew to blossom because you did this…and these didn’t because you did this…Explaining their mistakes is a much better way to improve their gardening and growing skills.

Listen to your children as well. You may be all about some pink and white flowers but your kids want to try and grow vegetables that they can eat. If you can do both great, if not let’s try their idea. Some kids will just never like gardening. There are plenty of children who do not like dirt, the idea of sitting in the mud or grass is not appealing, and there is no way to force them to like it. That’s fine too. They can still participate with things like garden planning, creating labels for the plants, decorating flower pots, and making little animal or fairy houses to put in the garden (talk about more in activities).

You must be realistic when starting this project. Don’t tackle a huge garden filled with apple trees over there, and potatoes over here, and some lilacs over there. Gardening and growing food is a skill that takes time. Good gardeners really don’t get enough credit. Work with the space you have and maybe start with 3-5 plants. Once they are good and growing add another if you can. If working with a small space here are some ideas:

Herb gardens do not need a lot of space and are nice for kids because they get a reward out of it. They get to see their plants grow and then they get to taste new delicious foods! Mint, lavender (which I personally hate to be honest), oregano, and basil are all easy to find recipes for. Chives is also a good one because it repels mosquito (more natural bug repellents here.)

free-standing-vertical-pallet-herb-garden

If you have some more room here are some great resources on garden mapping:

 Kitchen Garden Planner– This site is mostly to sway sales; however, they do have pre-planned maps and interactive maps to help you plan your garden.

Better Homes and Garden- Good article on how to map out your garden.

If you have the space, consider having seating within your garden. You and your child should be able to come outside after a long day and admire your hard work. A table and chairs amidst your plants is a great place for kids to relax or play. If you are starting a porch garden or indoor garden this applies to you too. Make sure you have a seating area near your plants. This will also make it easier to show off your child’s hard work. Some ideas for seating:

Hammock Nook11c769e28ffc5e341783eceef2d97ed9cute little bench...  Budget Backyard: 10 Ways to Use Cheap Concrete Cinder Blocks Outdoors

Dishfunctional Designs has some great ideas too!

Some things to consider:

Always keep your garden a safe area. Have a set place, preferably a locked place, to keep all sharp garden tools.

Use little (or preferably no) fertilizers or insecticides because they are toxic to people. Kids eating dirt isn’t really a big deal, kids eating chemicals can be.

I just want to add that I do not make any money per clicks or via referring companies so any pictures or links that I post are because I found them doing research and thought they would be beneficial to you 🙂